Word of the day

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tonyp
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Re: Word of the day

Post by tonyp » 03 Dec 2015, 14:07

stuie wrote:everyday"everyday chores like shopping and housework"
:question:
Waking up with an e******n.
Well maybe not everyday when you get older. :)
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Poshay
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Re: Word of the day

Post by Poshay » 03 Dec 2015, 17:16

Or when the taste on waking after a successful awayday eg Scunny lingers....... ?
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Re: Word of the day

Post by bristleposh » 03 Dec 2015, 18:06

Poshay wrote:Or when the taste on waking after a successful awayday eg Scunny lingers....... ?
:lol:

Bringing back memories of 'Not the Nine O'Clock News' kinda lingers
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stuie
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Re: Word of the day

Post by stuie » 04 Dec 2015, 11:16

Definitions for spoonerism
1.The transposition of usually initial sounds in a pair of words.

e.g.The fish will be sherved in the selter,"
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tonyp
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Re: Word of the day

Post by tonyp » 04 Dec 2015, 21:26

stuie wrote:Definitions for spoonerism
1.The transposition of usually initial sounds in a pair of words.

e.g.The fish will be sherved in the selter,"
:clap2: It is kisstomary to cuss the bride
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Re: Word of the day

Post by stuie » 05 Dec 2015, 11:55

Definitions for foudroyant
1.striking as with lightning; sudden and overwhelming in effect; stunning; dazzling.
2.Overwhelming and sudden in effect.

his sudden blaze of anger was foudroyant.
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Poshay
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Re: Word of the day

Post by Poshay » 05 Dec 2015, 15:03

Wasn't there an HMS Foudroyant?
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tonyp
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Re: Word of the day

Post by tonyp » 05 Dec 2015, 21:36

Poshay wrote:Wasn't there an HMS Foudroyant?
Yes. It was quite foudroyant wasn't it?
Image
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stuie
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Re: Word of the day

Post by stuie » 06 Dec 2015, 12:41

schmatte

\SHMAH-tuh\
noun
1. Slang. an old ragged garment; tattered article of clothing.
2. Slang. any garment.

Quotes
Adele went downhill after that, especially after the girls were in school. She'd go for days without a shower. Started walking around in that pink schmatte and the flip-flops even in winter.
-- Deborah Copaken Kogan, Between Here and April, 2008
Origin
Schmatte is from the Yiddish term shmate meaning "rag," which in turn comes from the Polish term szmata. It entered English in the mid-1900s.
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Re: Word of the day

Post by tonyp » 06 Dec 2015, 14:30

stuie wrote: Quotes
Adele went downhill after that, especially after the girls were in school. She'd go for days without a shower.
She did have a shower occasionally though.
Image

PS Great thread Stuie. Keep them coming.
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stuie
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Re: Word of the day

Post by stuie » 07 Dec 2015, 17:43

gambol

\GAM-buh l\
verb

intransitive verb
1. To dance and skip about in play; to frolic.
2. to skip about, as in dancing or playing; frolic.

Quotes
The idea had been to build apartment towers upon a grassy landscape where the young might gambol and the old might sit beneath shade trees, along sinuous footpaths.
-- Tom Wolfe, The Bonfire of the Vanities, 1987
Origin
Gambol is related to the Middle French term gambade meaning "a leap or spring." It entered English around 1500.
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bristleposh
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Re: Word of the day

Post by bristleposh » 07 Dec 2015, 17:53

stuie wrote:gambol

\GAM-buh l\
verb

intransitive verb
1. To dance and skip about in play; to frolic.
2. to skip about, as in dancing or playing; frolic.
I had a little gambol in the bookies earlier, backed a lamb
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Re: Word of the day

Post by stuie » 07 Dec 2015, 17:57

bristleposh wrote:
stuie wrote:gambol

\GAM-buh l\
verb

intransitive verb
1. To dance and skip about in play; to frolic.
2. to skip about, as in dancing or playing; frolic.
I had a little gambol in the bookies earlier, backed a lamb
:clap2:
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tonyp
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Re: Word of the day

Post by tonyp » 07 Dec 2015, 23:18

stuie wrote:
bristleposh wrote:
stuie wrote:gambol

\GAM-buh l\
verb

intransitive verb
1. To dance and skip about in play; to frolic.
2. to skip about, as in dancing or playing; frolic.
I had a little gambol in the bookies earlier, backed a lamb
:clap2:
:D :clap2:
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stuie
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Re: Word of the day

Post by stuie » 08 Dec 2015, 18:47

bombinate

\BOM-buh-neyt\
verb

intransitive verb
1. To buzz; to hum; to drone.
2. to make a humming or buzzing noise.

Quotes
Like his co-workers he had been somewhat stampeded by Dorn's imitative faculties, faculties which enabled the former journalist to bombinate twice as loud in a void three times as great as any of his colleagues.
-- Ben Hecht, Erik Dorn, 1921
Origin
Bombinate derives from the Latin verb bombināre, which is thought to have been coined by Rabelais on the basis of the Latin bombilāre, "to hum, buzz."
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